Discography

Thanks for stopping by to listen. You can purchase my releases at your local record store or online at the Merge Records, Third Man Records, and Bandcamp websites.

 
 
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Great Thunder EP- Released September 7, 2018

On the heels of last year’s critically acclaimed Out in the Storm, Crutchfield found herself looking to take a sharp turn away from the more rock-oriented influences of her recent records towards her more folk and country roots. “I would say that it is a complete 180 from the last record: super stripped-down, quiet, and with me performing solo, it’s a throwback to how I started,” writes Crutchfield. “Overall, the EP is a warm, kind of vibey recording.” 

 
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Out In The Storm - Released July 14, 2017

Out in the Storm, Katie Crutchfield’s fourth album as Waxahatchee and the follow-up to her Merge debut Ivy Tripp, is the blazing result of a woman reawakened. Her most autobiographical and honest album to date, Out in the Storm is a self-reflective anchor in the story of both her songwriting and her life.

The album was tracked at Miner Street Recordings in Philadelphia with John Agnello, a producer, recording engineer, and mixer known for working with some of the most iconic musicians of the last 25 years, including Dinosaur Jr. and Sonic Youth. Agnello and Crutchfield worked together for most of December 2016, along with the band: sister Allison Crutchfield on keyboards and percussion, Katherine Simonetti on bass, and Ashley Arnwine on drums; Katie Harkin, touring guitarist with Sleater-Kinney, also contributed lead guitar. At Agnello’s suggestion, the group recorded most of the music live to enhance their unity in a way that gives the album a fuller sound compared to past releases, resulting in one of Waxahatchee’s most guitar-driven releases to date.

Formats: 2-LP, Deluxe 2-LP, LP, CD, Digital

 
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Early Recordings - Released June 17, 2016

Katie Crutchfield has reissued Early Recordings on limited-edition cassette and digital download. Featuring new artwork by Chelsea Dirck, this release includes the first songs she wrote and recorded as Waxahatchee

Katie shared the impetus behind the release: They came out five years ago as a super limited split cassette that was mostly for friends and family, and truth be told, I had largely forgotten about them until this spring while on a solo tour of the West Coast. At first I was tentative about re-listening to these recordings, but the nostalgia I felt when re-hearing them was warm, and I thought it might be nice to make them available again.

Formats: Digital

 
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Ivy Tripp - Released April 7, 2015

Waxahatchee, the solo musical project of Katie Crutchfield, is named after a creek not far from her childhood home in Alabama and seems to represent both where she came from and where she’s going. Ivy Tripp drifts confidently from its predecessors and brings forth a more informed and powerful recognition of where Crutchfield has currently found herself. The lament and grieving for her youth seem to have been replaced with control and sheer self-honesty. “My life has changed a lot in the last two years, and it’s been hard for me to process my feelings other than by writing songs,” says Crutchfield. “I think a running theme [of Ivy Tripp] is steadying yourself on shaky ground and reminding yourself that you have control in situations that seem overwhelming, or just being cognizant in moments of deep confusion or sadness, and learning to really feel emotions and to grow from that.” 

Recorded and engineered by Kyle Gilbride of Wherever Audio at Crutchfield’s home on New York’s Long Island—with drums recorded in the gym of a local elementary school—Ivy Tripp presents a more developed and aged version of Waxahatchee. “The title Ivy Tripp is really just a term I made up for directionless-ness, specifically of the 20-something, 30-something, 40-something of today, lacking regard for the complaisant life path of our parents and grandparents. I have thought of it like this: [Waxahatchee’s last album] Cerulean Salt is a solid and Ivy Tripp is a gas.”

Formats: LP / CD / Digital

 
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Cerulean Salt - Released February 16, 2018

On her second full-length record as Waxahatchee, former P.S. Eliot singer Katie Crutchfield’s compelling hyper-personal poetry is continuously crushing. Cerulean Salt follows American Weekend—a collection of minimal acoustic-guitar pop written and recorded in a week at her family’s Birmingham home.

On this record, Crutchfield’s songs continue to be marked by her sharp, hooky songwriting; her striking voice and lyrics that simultaneously seem hyper-personal yet relentlessly relatable, teetering between endearingly nostalgic and depressingly dark. But whereas before, the thematic focus of her songcraft was on break-ups and passive-aggressive crushing, this record reflects on her family and Alabama upbringing. And whereas American Weekend was mostly just Crutchfield and her guitar, Cerulean Salt is occasionally amped up, with a full band and higher-fi production.

At times, Cerulean Salt creeps closer to the sound of P.S. Eliot: moody, ’90s-inspired rock backed by Keith Spencer and Swearin’ guitarist Kyle Gilbride on drums and bass. The full band means fleshed-out fuzzy lead guitars on “Coast to Coast,” its poppy hook almost masking its dark lyrics. Big distorted guitars and deep steady drums mark songs like “Misery Over Dispute” and “Waiting.”

There’s plenty of American Weekend’s introspection and minimalism to be found, though. “Blue Pt. II” is stripped down, Crutchfield and her sister Allison (of Swearin’) singing in harmony with deadpan vox. She’s still an open book, musing on self-doubt versus self-reliance, transience versus permanence. “Peace and Quiet” ebbs and flows from moody, minimal verses to a sing-song chorus. “Swan Dive” tackles nostalgia, transience, indifference, regret—over the minimal strum of an electric guitar, the picking at a chirpy riff, and the double-time tapping of a muted drum. The album closes with a haunting acoustic guitar reflection on “You’re Damaged,” possibly the best Waxahatchee song to date.